001: Interview with Melissa Viscount of Silhouette School Blog

001: Interview with Melissa Viscount of Silhouette School Blog


Download this episode here!

The Style Blues Podcast is finally here! The first episode is now live!

Chambrayblues.com/stylebluespodcast/episode001
Episode 001

Show Notes:

Interviews are Inspiring:

One of the things I wanted to accomplish with this podcast is to inspire you with interviews of people who have been successful in their sewing related businesses. As creative people, sometimes we think too narrow when it comes to business and making money from what we love.

Using a computer aided design tool is one great way to make your sewing business into something that will make you money. These computerized tools, such as the Silhouette machine are changing the industry in that you can now make quality custom appliques or other items from home with relatively little investment. When I first heard about the Silhouette a few years ago I had no idea what I could use something like that for. I had a blogger friend who told me about “Silhouette School” and I thought she was talking about an actual school in Chicago. Haha! Now, I see Silhouette projects all over the internet!

Just to be clear, “Silhouette School” is not an actual school or place, it’s the name of Melissa Viscount’s blog. Melissa has been very successful in teaching others how to use their Silhouette machines. When I was making a list of potential people with successful businesses to interview for this podcast, Melissa was at the very top of my list. She has really inspired me and I hope you will enjoy listening to how she built her online business around what she loves to do.

So without further ado, here’s the interview:

Talking with Melissa Viscount:

Thank you for joining me today Melissa!

Questions:

Did you ever imagine that your Silhouette machine would change your life?

  1. For those who are not familiar with the Silhouette machine, can you tell us a bit about How the Silhouette machine works? Can you design your own cuts/stencils?
  2. Are available designs copyrighted for home or commercial use?
  3. What are the file types for? Example SVG, DXF, PNG, and EPS
  4. Can designs be scaled for childrens, adult clothing?
  5. Quilting patterns?
  6. Cutting other materials besides vinyl or fabric, wood or metal?
  7. What other things do people use the machine for?

 

What are some of your favorite projects that people have created with Silhouette School?

I understand that your husband works with you full time, how does that work? Boss lady and Bob? Love your #bosslady hashtag!

Tell me about your Silhouette conference? Is it just in Atlanta or other areas?

Where can people find you online, social media?

www.silhouetteschoolblog.com (blog)

www.silhouetteu.com (membership site)

www.ultimatesilhouetteguide.com (books)

www.sofontsy.com (design and font market)

Inspiration for Your Business:

Wow, was she inspiring or what? I just loved hearing her story and I am so thrilled she shared it with us. The potential for having the ability to create your own customized designs is huge. There are unlimited ways to use computerized tools like this in a home based business. Not sure if you caught her mention the gal that paid off her house by designing custom wooden hanger labels for brides? Wow! That is so amazing!

It’s interesting to me that Melissa’s niche is really in education. She mentioned that she doesn’t really do project tutorials but rather focuses on teaching others how to use their Silhouette machines. I think education is so important, sharing your knowledge can make a world of difference to someone else that may be struggling. Melissa does such a great job of that. I also find it fascinating that she is successful on a global scale. People around the world have read her Ebooks and applied her knowledge their businesses wherever they may live.

That’s all for today, thank you so much for listening! I will have more interviews coming up in the next few weeks. I hope you are inspired by today’s episode, I know I certainly was.

Learn More About Melissa:

Melissa Viscount is a Full time blogger at Silhouette School Blog.com and her new site, So Fontsy. Melissa is a wife, mom and author of 10 books on using the Silhouette Machine.

Melissa Viscount launched Silhouette School exactly 4 years ago on a whim after receiving a Silhouette Portrait from her husband for Christmas 2013. Since then more than 35 Million readers have enjoyed her more than 1000 free tutorials on how to use the Silhouette cutting machines, Silhouette Studio software, and accessories, techniques, and tools.  Due to demand from her very loyal readers, Melissa released her first ebook, The Ultimate Silhouette Guide, three years – and now 11 books ago. More than 80,000 copies of her guides – covering topics from Silhouette for business owners to designing in and mastering Silhouette Studio – have been sold since. Many are now sold with the Silhouette machine bundles. In June 2016 – Melissa’s husband, Bob, left his full time job in pharmaceuticals to join her full-time and take over the business side of their quickly growing Silhouette School brand. Shortly after, they launched their premium membership website Silhouette U – which – as of today – has nearly 5,000 active members. Just last week, they expanded their business again with the launch of So Fontsy – a commercial use design and font marketplace geared toward die cut crafters.

It’s amazing that Melissa has not only enjoyed blogging about Silhouette, but her expertise in the crafting industry has made her a sought after Silhouette (and blogging) instructor – having taught hundreds of crafters and fellow bloggers nationwide. She’s also served as a consultant to well established brands and well known brands in this craft industry – or those trying to tap into it.

She has been honored to be the keynote speaker at multiple craft and Silhouette conferences across the country including being invited back multiple times to the All Things Silhouette Conferences.

You can find out even more about Melissa by clicking on the links below:

www.silhouetteschoolblog.com (blog)

www.silhouetteu.com (membership site)

www.ultimatesilhouetteguide.com (books)

www.sofontsy.com (design and font market)

Style Blues Podcast Ep.001|ChambrayBluesBlog|Chambrayblues.com

Want to be a part of the Chambray Blues Sewing Community? Join the Facebook Group Here.

If you have questions about this episode contact us at info@chambrayblues.com.

 

How to Restyle a Boring Denim Jacket

How to Restyle a Boring Denim Jacket

We all have clothes in our closet we no longer wear, here are some tips on restyling and updating a boring denim jacket!

Re-Style Your Denim jacket, easy sewing project|Chambrayblues|chambrayblues.com
Don’t forget to Pin it!

Re-Style Your Boring Denim Jacket

I have had this denim jacket in my closet for a few years. Most of the time, I rarely wear it. The jacket is too short in the sleeves and body for me, and too small around the middle. I bought this denim jacket on a whim when I was at a blog conference and I needed a jacket while sitting in a cool room listening to the conference speakers. If I had thought about it longer, I wouldn’t have bought it in the first place because it didn’t really fit. Sometimes you do funny things when you are cold!

I didn’t want to give the jacket away since it is practically new, and I decided the best thing to do would be to restyle it so it suits me better. I added wide lace to the sleeves and hem to make the jacket longer so it fits me. Then I was able to add 2″ to the center front by removing the old button placket and adding wide pleated trim. The jacket now fits better around the midriff where I need it. It doesn’t button closed, but that’s okay since I never buttoned it up anyway. Here’s how I made all the adjustments.

Re-Style an Old Boring Denim Jacket|ChambrayBlues|chambrayblues.com
Change up your old jacket for a new look with bits of vintage lace and trims.

Supplies Needed:

• 3 yards of 4″ wide lace

• 2 yards rosebud trim (sold in the lace section at the fabric store)

• 1 spool 1/2″ wide edge lace

• 1/2 yard vintage lace for yoke (I used an old skirt)

• the legs from 1 pair old pair of denim jeans, cut into 2 1/2″ strips

• matching thread, scissors, sewing machine

Re-Style a Boring Denim Jacket|Chambrayblues|Chambrayblues.com
Use vintage lace to cover the front and back yoke.

Yoke Directions:

1. Lay your jacket on a table and pin seams together along the front and back yoke, neck and sleeve. Trace the front yoke shape onto a piece of craft paper. Add seam allowance and cut out. Repeat for the back yoke (this should be on the fold)

2. Place the pattern pieces on top of your vintage lace. I used the bottom hem of an old skirt that had a beige lining. Line up the bottom of the yoke of the pattern with the hem of the skirt or other finished edge of lace. Trace around the seams, adding 1/2″ seam allowance for the shoulder seam. Be sure pieces line up from the front to back shoulder. Cut out the front pattern piece. Repeat for the back yoke, using your first pattern piece as a guide to match the neck and seam edges. Cut the pattern out of your vintage lace.

I kept the existing skirt lining intact with my lace since I liked the light color behind the lace. You could also just let the denim show through the lace if you don’t have a lining.

Re-Style your Boring Denim Jacket|Chambrayblues|Chambrayblues.com

3. Stitch the front and back shoulders of the lace yoke together. Add 1/2″ narrow lace trim to finish armhole edge using a 2.5 zig-zag stitch setting. Fold under lace trim ends and secure.

4. Place the lace yoke on top of the right side of denim yoke. Pin in place. Zig-zag stitch in place with a narrow stitch (2.5) along neck edge, center front, bottom of yoke and armhole. Repeat for back yoke.

Re-Style a Boring Denim Jacket|Chambrayblues|Chambrayblues.com
Use vintage lace to cover the front and back yoke.

Updating the Center Front

1. Cut off front button placket from both sides of the jacket, leaving collar intact. Reserve extra pieces for another project.

2. Make pleated trim for jacket front. Cut off the legs from an old pair of jeans. Cut 6 strips of denim 2 1/2″ wide.

3. Pleat the denim strips by making 1″ folds in the denim with a salad fork as you sew. It’s a bit awkward at first, but you will soon see how easy it is to make even pleats. I love this method and will definitely use it again soon! Don’t worry about the raw edges, the fraying of the denim is part of this vintage charm!

4. Attach the pleated trim down the jacket front from collar to hem with a single needle stitch 3.0 setting. Overlap the pleated trim and center front edge by 1/2″ , pin in place. Top stitch 1″ away from first line of stitching on the right side. Be sure to catch any loose pockets in the seam, my jacket had pockets that were sewn into the original placket and I needed to anchor them in place to keep them from flopping about.

5. Cut a row of lace flowerettes and apply them down the center front on top of the pleated trim. Zig-zag stitch in place. You can use a different lace trim about 1″ wide instead if your lace is an allover pattern and doesn’t have rows.

6. Cut one row of flowers from the flower trim, zig zag stitch on either side of the trim along the center front, on top of the lace and pleats. I preferred my trim slightly off center, covering half of the lace for a unique effect.

Re-Style a Boring Denim Jacket|Chambrayblues|Chambrayblues.com
4″ gathered lace was added to the cuffs and hem of the jacket.

Updating the Jacket Cuffs and Hem

1. Gather the 4″ lace 1/2″ from top edge.

2. Fit lace to cuff edge, trim. Pin in place. Sew a zig-zag (3.0) stitch along edge on the wrong side of the cuff.

3. Add a flowered trim to cuff. Cut the floral trim to the same width and length as the cuff. Pin in place on right side of jacket. I cut the trim 1″ short to leave the button and button hole on the sleeve intact so it was still use-able.

4. Zig-zag stitch flower trim in place on top and bottom of cuff.

That’s it! This hack only cost me about $15.00. I already had the jacket and the lace skirt, so it was just a matter of purchasing the trims. We have lots of old jeans around the house and you can’t even tell that the pleated trim on the front of the jacket doesn’t match the rest of the jacket. It’s fun to mix up your old clothes and make them feel new again! Be sure to share pics in the Chambray Blues Sewing Group on Facebook if you remix your old jacket, we would love to see it!

Re-Style Your Denim jacket, easy sewing project|Chambrayblues|chambrayblues.com
Don’t forget to Pin it!

 

Like this post? Try some of these other posts:

Sew Along 2018, the Year of the Blues!

How to Read a Sewing Pattern Envelope

How to Shorten Pattern Sleeves

How to Measure for Pattern Alterations

What You Should Know About the Cricut Maker

How to Read a Sewing Pattern Envelope

How to Read a Sewing Pattern Envelope

Learning how to read a sewing pattern envelope is the first step in sewing a garment. Learn these tips for success!

Learn to read a pattern envelope|Chambraybluesblog|Chambrayblues.com
Learning to read the pattern envelope is important for sewing success.

 

My first experience with sewing involved picking out patterns and proper fabric at our local fabric store when I was 7 years old. The woman who ran the small store was very experienced and she could answer any questions that you might have and steer you on the right path. Today, things are are very different. So many people are learning to sew for the very first time and have no one to ask for help. Even the employees in the fabric store (if you can find one!) don’t always know how to answer your questions.

Learn to read the pattern envelope before you choose your pattern and you will feel much more comfortable with the process. This post will help you know how difficult the pattern is, what fabric and notions to buy, what size pattern you need and give you an idea of what the garment will cost to make.

Reading a Sewing Pattern Envelope

1) Choose your style in the pattern style book. Pull out the desired pattern from the storage drawer in the store and view the back of the envelope. Not sure how to do this? Watch this FB Live video.

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2016768785029847&id=1912224668817593&_rdr

How to read a sewing pattern envelope|Chambraybluesblog|Chambrayblues.com
Most sewing patterns have the body measurements listed on the envelope flap.

2) Find the envelope flap. Most patterns have the body measurements listed here for each size. Compare your body measurements to find the size that is closest to your measurements. Ready to wear sizes are not the same as pattern sizes, so don’t buy a pattern based on your ready to wear size. It won’t work!

How to Read a Pattern Envelope|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
Back of McCalls 7100 pattern

The Pattern Size Chart

3) Look at the description of the garment on the top of the rectangular chart on the envelope. This description tells you how many pattern pieces are included in this particular style. Easy patterns have fewer pieces, you can sew an entire dress with as little as 4 or 5 pattern pieces. More advanced patterns such as coats have lots of pieces, some coats have as many as 28! Different pattern companies have the sewing level clearly marked in the description as beginner, intermediate, advanced etc. Make note of what notions are required. Do you have the skill to sew them? Items like buttons and zippers require more skill to sew. If you are a beginner sewer, you may want to look for a pattern with draw string or elastic closures instead until you have more experience.

4) Recommended fabrics are included on the envelope for each style. Restrict your fabric purchases to only these fabric choices for that style. This is important for beginning sewers who often get misled when purchasing fabric for the first time. Woven fabrics and knits for example, require very different construction methods so they are not interchangeable. If you want your garment to turn out, you must choose the proper fabric for that style.

How to read a pattern envelope|ChambrayBluesBlog|www.chambrayblues.com
Some pattern envelopes have a knit fabric stretch chart.

5) Knit styles sometimes have stretch measurements on the back of the pattern envelope. Place your fabric on the fold over the black rectangle marking on the top of the envelope. Stretch the fabric across the chart to see if it will work for that style.

5) Choose which style view you want to make from the front of the envelope. You may want to circle view A, B, C on the envelope so it’s easy to remember.

6) Look at the “size” column, calculate how much fabric you will need by reading down the chart. Fabric comes in widths of 45″ (cottons or specialty fabrics generally) or 60″ (knits, wool, lace, rayon, fleece, crepe, satin). You will need to purchase extra fabric if you plan to make alterations. I routinely purchase 1/4-1/2 yard extra fabric for each style to be sure I have enough yardage. When I forget to do this, I usually end up having to run back to the store and sometimes the fabric isn’t there any more, or it won’t be off the same bolt which can be a slightly different color. Be sure to buy enough fabric for your project all at once, you can always make something else from the scraps!

The Yardage Chart

7) Extra fabric will be required for matching one way prints or fabrics that have a nap. Buy at least 1 extra yard per style to match plaids. In the photo above, separate yardages are given for fabrics with nap. Fabrics with nap include corduroy or velvet, use these yardages if you are sewing with those items.

8) Don’t forget to purchase interfacing, and lining if your pattern requires it. These are listed separately, below the other fabric and notion requirements. Also, be sure you have a selection of fresh sharp sewing machine needles at home in case one breaks while you are sewing! (Hint, buy needles that are designed for the type of fabric you choose. Different fabrics such as knits, satin or denim require special sewing machine needles.)

What if I make a mistake buying my Pattern?

What happens if you do your best to read the pattern envelope and make a mistake in your purchase? If you get home and realize you purchased the wrong type of fabric for your pattern, most stores will return it. The fabric must be uncut and unwashed. You must have your receipt, including the cutting slip to get proper credit. Sewing patterns can be returned only if they are unopened. Usually, I keep patterns and fabric if I decide not to use them right away. I prefer to have a stash of things in my closet for reference even if I haven’t sewn them. You will quickly become a collector if you aren’t already!

I like to keep track of what I spend on each garment for my own enjoyment. My custom designs are akin to designer brands, they are good quality and custom made to fit me perfectly. Do not compare your custom sewn clothing to things you would buy at a discount or department store, those garments are poor quality and not custom made.

Every time you make a new project you learn something else. Think of this sewing journey as one that will be on going. The time to start is now!

 

Don’t forget to Pin this post!

Check out some of these other tutorials:

Sew Along 2018, the Year of the Blues!

How to Shorten Pattern Sleeves

What You Should Know About the Cricut Maker

How to Measure for Pattern Alterations

 

What You Should Know About the Cricut Maker

What You Should Know About the Cricut Maker

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

http://chambrayblues.com/2018/02/02/know-cricut-maker/
This new Cricut Maker machine is a great add-on to your sewing room. There are lots of great features that you will love! Here’s what you need to know before making a purchase. This post is sponsored by Cricut. I was compensated in some way for writing this post. Any opinions given are completely my own.

What you need to know about the Cricut Maker|Chambray Blues Blog|Chambrayblues.com
Cricut Maker, design your projects on your Ipad!

The Maker Pros and the Cons

I have been looking at machines for a long time, comparing different features and contemplating what I would use them for in my creative business. Each model Cricut machine does so many different things that I had a hard time choosing between them. It was hard to know which options would be best for me and exactly how I would use them without first trying out the machine.

One of the best features in my opinion, is the ability to design with Cricut on my Ipad. There are a couple of Cricut Machines that do this but I still wasn’t sure how often I would use them. It seemed like most reviews I read for the machine were used for cutting Heat Transfer Vinyl (or HTV as it’s known), cutting paper or cutting plastic for making stencils. Since I haven’t used a lot of those materials in my creative business, it just didn’t seem like the right fit for me.

Recently, I stumbled across an online video from one of my blogger friends of the Cricut Maker cutting entire sewing pattern pieces. This was a total game changer for me, and I knew that I would use the Cricut Maker tool a lot in this manner! I couldn’t wait to get one and start making projects! Excitingly, the folks at Cricut chose me for their Maker campaign. Thank you Cricut!

 

What you need to know about the Cricut Maker|ChambrayBluesBlog|chambrayblues.com
The Cricut Maker has a storage compartment for all your supplies.

 

Cricut is Easy to Use

Being new to this type of equipment, I was pleased to find out how easy the machine is to use. It only has 2 cords to plug-in and takes minutes to set up. The blades and supplies can all be stored right with the machine, another huge plus since I am organizationally challenged.

Especially helpful is the color coordination of the pieces. I can tell by the color which pieces go together and exactly what they cut. Everything comes labeled and is easy to read. This makes set up so easy!

Cricut Maker Review|Chambray Blues Blog|chambrayblues.com
Cutting mats for each type of material.

The cutting mats come in different colors as well. There are different mats for each type of media such as printer paper (Lightgrip), cardstock (Standard grip), or fabric and leather (Heavy grip). The mats have an adhesive that keeps your materials in place while the blade is cutting for the most accurate precision. It’s easy to remove the material after cutting. Cricut also supplies handy tools for precisely lifting your cut design off the mat. They have thought of everything!

What you need to know about the Cricut Maker|ChambrayBlues|chambrayblues.com
Sewing tools and supplies for using the Cricut Maker.

 

Cricut also has basic sewing tools to accompany your Maker Machine. These are great for beginning sewers and it has all the basics: fabric scissors, tape measure, leather thimble, pin cushion, pins, seam ripper, thread clippers. They also have a variety of marking pens.  I love that they all match and look lovely!

Cricut is for Sewing

There are a lot of things you can make with this machine, but the most exciting is that Cricut has a partnership with Simplicity patterns. There are a number of Simplicity patterns that you can download from Cricut’s Design Space right to your Cricut Maker and cut. Imagine!

Are you excited? Me too! Here are a few examples of what’s available:

1. Doll clothes

2. Childrens clothes

3. Hats

4. Bow ties

5. Headbands

Obiviously, there are some limitations since the cutting area is only so large, and the fabric size is limited to the size of the cutting mat. But it is amazing how this technology is possible! There are also quilt block patterns available!

Some of the fabrics you can cut with your Cricut are:

1. Cotton wovens

2. Polyester

3. Denim

4. Felt

5. Canvas

6. Bonded Fabrics such as craft felt, web or fleece.

 

What you need to know about the Cricut Maker|Chambray Blues Blog|chambrayblues.com
The Cricut Maker cuts fabric, HTV, paper, just about anything!

I will have my first project will be ready soon! Have you used the Cricut Maker? What did you make? I would love to know! You can share your projects in my Facebook Group here.

Be sure to Pin this post!

Thanks to Cricut for sponsoring this post!

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

Need more inspiration? Check out these other posts:

Sew Along 2018, the Year of the Blues!

How to Shorten Pattern Sleeves

How to Measure for Pattern Alterations

How to Shorten Pattern Sleeves

How to Shorten Pattern Sleeves

Shortening your pattern sleeves isn’t that complicated but it does take a little bit of know how. Here’s my best tips on shortening, it’s easier than you think!

How to Shorten Sleeves the Right Way|ChambrayBluesblog|www.chambrayblues.com
McCalls Cuting layout M7061

We have all been there. You work so hard on a sewing project, only to discover too late that the sleeves are too long. Chopping off the end of the sleeve and re-hemming does not work in most circumstances because sleeves are not perfect rectangles. It’s easy to shorten them at the beginning of the sewing process. Even before you cut! Here’s how!

Shorten Pattern Sleeves the Right Way

  1. The first step is to be certain how much the sleeves need to be shortened. The best way to do this is to use the measurement from the center back neck, to the wrist. This is not included on pattern envelopes, it used to be on there but for some reason they don’t have it on there any more. Take your own measurement, or have someone else do it for you.
  2. Next, line up your back pattern and the sleeve pattern pieces. Overlap the seam allowances (so they are not included in the measurement), then measure the pattern from center back, across the shoulder to the sleeve hem. Do not include the hem as you measure.
  3. Compare the two measurements to find the amount needed. For example, if my pattern measurement is 30″ and my center back neck to wrist measurement is 28″ I need to shorten the sleeve length by 2″. ( 30″-28″=2″)
  4. Add wearing ease. Generally speaking you want to have ease of at least 1″. You can add more if you wish, but no less. As your arm bends you need extra fabric to compensate for the movement, so it’s important to have enough wearing ease or your garment will be uncomfortable and too short in the sleeves.

Sound complicated? It’s really not. Here’s a video tutorial:

You can follow my You Tube Chanel for regular updates and more tutorials. Also, be sure to subscribe for the Sew Along and join our Facebook group here. I am doing weekly Facebook live sewing sessions, answering questions and hoping to inspire you to keep sewing!

Don’t forget to Pin this post!

Read more about the Sew Along here.

Read more about Measuring for Pattern Alterations here.

How to Measure for Pattern Alterations

How to Measure for Pattern Alterations

Knowing how to measure for pattern alterations is very important for successful sewing. Here are some tips to get you on the right track!

Sew Along|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com

Measure Before You Cut

It may seem obvious, but measuring plays a big part in sewing. The trick is to measure as accurately as possible before you start altering the pattern. The back of the pattern envelope has basic body measurements for each size. Compare your measurements to the envelope to determine what size pattern to cut.

The measurements are on the envelope flap. Find your estimated size at the top (start with your ready to wear size), then read down the column to find each measurement. You may find that your body size is not the ready to wear size you normally buy in the store. Purchase the pattern size that is closest to your body measurements. Most patterns have several sizes in them which gives you options when you are ready to alter.

Just to clarify, these dimensions are not pattern measurements, they are body measurements. We will cover the pattern measurements in a separate post.

Here’s a live video to walk you through the process.

Like my page Chambray Blues Sewing Tips and Tutorials for updates! 

Important Tips:

  1. Keep the measuring tape parallel to the ground as you measure.
  2. Don’t stretch the tape too tight, vinyl tape measures will stretch and give you a measurement that is inaccurate. Keep the tape taught, but don’t over extend it.
  3. Include a sleeve length measurement. This is not listed on the pattern envelope. Measure from center back neck, across the shoulder, down the arm to the wrist bone. We will use this measurement for accurate sleeve alterations.
  4. Always measure across the fullest part of the body.
  5. Make note of your body measurements for bust, waist, hip, and center back waist length. Then compare them to the size information on the pattern envelope. If your measurements are different, you will have to do some pattern alterations. More info to come!

This week’s goal is to buy the Mc Call’s pattern, take your measurements and choose your fabric. I will have tips on choosing fabric for this project soon!

Don’t forget to pin this post!

How to Take Body Measurements for Sewing|Chambray Blues Blog|chambrayblues.com

For information on the complete Sew Along, read this post!

Sew Along 2018, the Year of the Blues!

Sew Along 2018, the Year of the Blues!

Sew Along with me! It’s a great way to stay motivated and learn new skills. This line up of great styles is perfect for those who want to explore new patterns and learn more about custom sewing and alteration details.

Sew Along Master Class

Here’s your chance at sewing success! I am starting a monthly sew along class. This class will be completely free and you can sew one month or all 12 as you choose. Most patterns are easy, we will have videos, Facebook lives too on each step!

I have chosen these commercial patterns for this Sew Along. Partially because I know people struggle with them and I can help, but they are also readily available and have the majority of sizes people are looking for. Here is the list, stock up on the next sale for the entire year and get sewing!

January: You will love this cozy Funnel Neck top. Make just the top, or buy extra fabric for the leggings, if you choose. This pattern is McCalls 7061.

Princess Dress|Chambraybluesblog|Chambrayblues.com

February: What’s not to love with this date night dinner dress! Cherry red is perfect for Valentine’s Day! Mc Calls 7535 is easy to sew and looks great on all shapes! Suitable for woven or knits.

March: I adore this Marfy Caftan. Make it long or short, wear it over a swim suit, out to dinner or just around the house. This easy pattern is Marfy F3921.

April: Mimi G Style pattern, love this jacket with optional capelet. Mimi G Style, Simplicity pattern S1016. Learn to sew rainwear fabrics and make buttonholes. This pattern has a lot of extra details on pockets, sleeves and caplet collar as optional custom designs.

May: Learn about stripes this month with this fabulous shirt dress. We will learn collars, facings, and how to work with bias stripes. Pattern is McCalls M7084.

June: Perfect for the romantic summer evening, this chic blouse would be great with chiffon sleeves. We will use Vogue 9243 for this project.

July: Explore vintage pattern Simplicity 8445. Darling! This pattern is available with long sleeve or short sleeve design options. We will learn about constructing collars, yokes and sleeve cuffs.

August: The perfect summer skirt! Very easy pattern and can be reversible! Easy and quick construction, includes a straight style option if you don’t care for the A-line look. This is McCalls 7129.

September: You will love learning about denim this month with this super trendy set of overalls! Great for back to school!Great way to learn to work with denim fabrics. Mc Calls 7547.

October: Fabulous knit top, can be stretch lace, stretch velvet, knit or sweat shirt fleece. Or use all four fabrics! This is Mc Calls 6992.

November: Learn to make custom fit jeans. We will cover specific pattern alterations to get a great fit! More advanced fitting techniques are easy with McCalls 5894.

December: Close out the year learning satin, brocade or velvet techniques. We will sew this darling Gertie vintage pattern for the holiday dress of your dreams! Gertie does vintage so well! This is Butterick 6412.

I am also giving away a free monthly calendar to new subscribers where you can have each task listed for every month in the sew along.

Print your free downloadable calendar here.

Sew Along, the year of the blues|Chambray Blues Blog|chambrayblues.com

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