Tag: Cricut maker

5 Step Easy Headband

5 Step Easy Headband

This headband is easy to make with the Cricut Maker! Just 5 steps to a finished project that will take less than 1/2 hour to make!

5 step easy headband|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com

 

5 Step Easy Headband

It’s super easy to make a headband with the Cricut Maker! This project is already in the Cricut Design space so it doesn’t take long to download it and put it together. I made this headband from some fabric scraps leftover from my last project. You will need about 1/4 yard of cotton fabric for this project, and 6″ of 1/2″ narrow elastic.

 

What you need to know about the Cricut Maker|Chambray Blues Blog|chambrayblues.com
The Cricut Maker cuts fabric, HTV, paper, just about anything!

Directions:

Download the Simplicity Headband pattern to your Cricut Maker.

Apply your fabric to your pink fabric cutting mat. Cut the pieces with your Cricut machine. It’s really easy! Then you are ready to sew!

Sewing Directions:

5 Step easy headband|chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com

  1. Stitch along the long edges of the large rectangle with 1/4″ hem. Turn and stitch again over your first row of stitching.
  2. Gather the ends of the rectangle with a basting stitch, pull up threads.
  3. Make the elastic casing. I changed the construction slightly from the Simplicity directions, just fold the small rectangle into thirds with the elastic inside and zig zag stitch over the top. Easy Peasy!
  4. Attach large rectangle ends to ends of elastic piece with a single needle stitch 3.0.
  5. Fold the small square pieces into thirds, secure over the seam where the elastic is attached to the headband with a few more zig zag stitches.

5 step easy headband|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com

That’s all there is to it! This project is perfect addition for your self care routine. Hold your hair back when you are washing your face, applying makeup, having a facial, etc. You can also wear it to the grocery store on those bad hair days! My Cricut blogger friends have gotten together to post about some other self care ideas that you can make with a Cricut. Click on the link below to see what else you can make to pamper yourself with your Cricut!

Don’t forget to Pin it!

Need more inspiration? Try these other projects:

What You Should Know About the Cricut Maker

3 Step Easy T-Shirt Pattern Hack

001: Interview with Melissa Viscount of Silhouette School Blog

How to Restyle a Boring Denim Jacket

How to Read a Sewing Pattern Envelope

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3 Step Easy T-Shirt Pattern Hack

3 Step Easy T-Shirt Pattern Hack

There are many ways to make a simple t-shirt into an updated style. This easy 3 step pattern hack will add style to any wardrobe!

3stepeasyt-shirt|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com

 

 

I started this pattern hack by finding some adorable pink polkadot fabric from Walmart. It’s a woven fabric, and I loved the pretty colors. I decided it would be a perfect addition to my t-shirt pattern. My main fabric is a soft white jersey knit also from Walmart.

The pattern I used here is McCalls #7331. It’s just a basic t-shirt pattern, but I made 3 simple changes to it with the help of my Cricut Maker. First, cut out the t-shirt pattern in your size from your desired fabric (or you can use a couple of store bought t-shirts, directions for that are below.)

Add style to your t-shirt with this easy pattern hack!

 

3 Step Easy Pattern Hack:

1. Login to Cricut Design Space here.

2. Download my free 3 Step Easy T-Shirt Hack pattern file here.

3. Cut out the pieces with your Cricut Maker.

It’s really easy to sew and fast to assemble by cutting the pieces with your Cricut! This post is sponsored by Cricut. Any opinions given are completely my own.

Bell Sleeve detail|Chambraybluesblog|www.chambrayblues.com

 

Assembly Instructions:

1. Fold sleeve bands in half, right sides out. Stitch together with 5/8″ seam allowance on the long edge.

2. Cut your sleeve piece in half just above the elbow. Sew the contrasting rectangle piece underneath the raw edge of the sleeve with a narrow zig zag stitch 1.5 wide, overlapping the pieces by 1/2 inch.

THE RAW EDGE OF THE KNIT T-SHIRT IS SUPPOSED TO SHOW as in the photo above.

3. Gather the bottom part of the sleeve by stitching along the top edge with 5.0 basting stitch (I added 3″ in the sleeve width to my existing pattern to make the gathered ruffle). Pull up threads and gather the piece to fit the sleeve band (check the fit on your arm before you finish sewing). Overlap the gathered knit sleeve on top of the contrasting fabric by about 1/2″ (right sides up). Stitch in place with narrow zig zag stitch 1.5 wide. THE GATHERED RAW EDGE IS SUPPOSED TO SHOW as in photo.

4. Add lace trim to the bottom of the sleeve hem by stitching lace on with 1/4″ seam allowance using a narrow zig zag stitch.

5. Place the neck facing right side up on the front of the t-shirt neckline with the two pieces touching at center front. Pin in place. Stitch along the outside edge with a narrow zig zag stitch. Tack the facing with the zig zag stitch at center front 1″ from bottom to secure as in photo below.

 

6. Slash center front along the facing at center front to the bottom edge of the facing. Sew lace edging over raw edge with zig zag stitch, folding lace to miter at corners. Sew shoulder seams together. Add lace all around the neck edge, front and back with the same method, folding under ends at center front and tacking in place.

7. Add lace trim to outside of neck facing, stitching again over your first stitching with the same narrow zig zag stitch.

8. Finish shirt by stitching sleeves into armholes, and sewing underarm seam. Hem, press and enjoy! Share with your friends!

 

If you do not want to make an entire t-shirt, you can create this look with two old t-shirts:

1. Cut out contrasting pieces with your Cricut Maker as above.

2. Remove neck ribbing on old t-shirt.

3. Cut 7″ wide strip of fabric off the bottom of one of the t-shirts.

4. Gather fabric along top edge, as in step 3 above. Attach contrasting sleeve trim to existing sleeve edge and lace as described above.

5. Add contrasting fabric at neck as described in step 5 above.

 

Thanks to Cricut for sponsoring this post! If you want more pattern ideas, try these other posts:

How to Restyle a Boring Denim Jacket

How to Read a Sewing Pattern Envelope

How to Shorten Pattern Sleeves

How to Measure for Pattern Alterations

What You Should Know About the Cricut Maker

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

Please follow and like us:
What You Should Know About the Cricut Maker

What You Should Know About the Cricut Maker

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

http://chambrayblues.com/2018/02/02/know-cricut-maker/
This new Cricut Maker machine is a great add-on to your sewing room. There are lots of great features that you will love! Here’s what you need to know before making a purchase. This post is sponsored by Cricut. I was compensated in some way for writing this post. Any opinions given are completely my own.

What you need to know about the Cricut Maker|Chambray Blues Blog|Chambrayblues.com
Cricut Maker, design your projects on your Ipad!

The Maker Pros and the Cons

I have been looking at machines for a long time, comparing different features and contemplating what I would use them for in my creative business. Each model Cricut machine does so many different things that I had a hard time choosing between them. It was hard to know which options would be best for me and exactly how I would use them without first trying out the machine.

One of the best features in my opinion, is the ability to design with Cricut on my Ipad. There are a couple of Cricut Machines that do this but I still wasn’t sure how often I would use them. It seemed like most reviews I read for the machine were used for cutting Heat Transfer Vinyl (or HTV as it’s known), cutting paper or cutting plastic for making stencils. Since I haven’t used a lot of those materials in my creative business, it just didn’t seem like the right fit for me.

Recently, I stumbled across an online video from one of my blogger friends of the Cricut Maker cutting entire sewing pattern pieces. This was a total game changer for me, and I knew that I would use the Cricut Maker tool a lot in this manner! I couldn’t wait to get one and start making projects! Excitingly, the folks at Cricut chose me for their Maker campaign. Thank you Cricut!

 

What you need to know about the Cricut Maker|ChambrayBluesBlog|chambrayblues.com
The Cricut Maker has a storage compartment for all your supplies.

 

Cricut is Easy to Use

Being new to this type of equipment, I was pleased to find out how easy the machine is to use. It only has 2 cords to plug-in and takes minutes to set up. The blades and supplies can all be stored right with the machine, another huge plus since I am organizationally challenged.

Especially helpful is the color coordination of the pieces. I can tell by the color which pieces go together and exactly what they cut. Everything comes labeled and is easy to read. This makes set up so easy!

Cricut Maker Review|Chambray Blues Blog|chambrayblues.com
Cutting mats for each type of material.

The cutting mats come in different colors as well. There are different mats for each type of media such as printer paper (Lightgrip), cardstock (Standard grip), or fabric and leather (Heavy grip). The mats have an adhesive that keeps your materials in place while the blade is cutting for the most accurate precision. It’s easy to remove the material after cutting. Cricut also supplies handy tools for precisely lifting your cut design off the mat. They have thought of everything!

What you need to know about the Cricut Maker|ChambrayBlues|chambrayblues.com
Sewing tools and supplies for using the Cricut Maker.

 

Cricut also has basic sewing tools to accompany your Maker Machine. These are great for beginning sewers and it has all the basics: fabric scissors, tape measure, leather thimble, pin cushion, pins, seam ripper, thread clippers. They also have a variety of marking pens.  I love that they all match and look lovely!

Cricut is for Sewing

There are a lot of things you can make with this machine, but the most exciting is that Cricut has a partnership with Simplicity patterns. There are a number of Simplicity patterns that you can download from Cricut’s Design Space right to your Cricut Maker and cut. Imagine!

Are you excited? Me too! Here are a few examples of what’s available:

1. Doll clothes

2. Childrens clothes

3. Hats

4. Bow ties

5. Headbands

Obiviously, there are some limitations since the cutting area is only so large, and the fabric size is limited to the size of the cutting mat. But it is amazing how this technology is possible! There are also quilt block patterns available!

Some of the fabrics you can cut with your Cricut are:

1. Cotton wovens

2. Polyester

3. Denim

4. Felt

5. Canvas

6. Bonded Fabrics such as craft felt, web or fleece.

 

What you need to know about the Cricut Maker|Chambray Blues Blog|chambrayblues.com
The Cricut Maker cuts fabric, HTV, paper, just about anything!

I will have my first project will be ready soon! Have you used the Cricut Maker? What did you make? I would love to know! You can share your projects in my Facebook Group here.

Be sure to Pin this post!

Thanks to Cricut for sponsoring this post!

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

Need more inspiration? Check out these other posts:

Sew Along 2018, the Year of the Blues!

How to Shorten Pattern Sleeves

How to Measure for Pattern Alterations

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