Tag: knits

3 Step Easy T-Shirt Pattern Hack

3 Step Easy T-Shirt Pattern Hack

There are many ways to make a simple t-shirt into an updated style. This easy 3 step pattern hack will add style to any wardrobe!

3stepeasyt-shirt|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com

 

 

I started this pattern hack by finding some adorable pink polkadot fabric from Walmart. It’s a woven fabric, and I loved the pretty colors. I decided it would be a perfect addition to my t-shirt pattern. My main fabric is a soft white jersey knit also from Walmart.

The pattern I used here is McCalls #7331. It’s just a basic t-shirt pattern, but I made 3 simple changes to it with the help of my Cricut Maker. First, cut out the t-shirt pattern in your size from your desired fabric (or you can use a couple of store bought t-shirts, directions for that are below.)

Add style to your t-shirt with this easy pattern hack!

 

3 Step Easy Pattern Hack:

1. Login to Cricut Design Space here.

2. Download my free 3 Step Easy T-Shirt Hack pattern file here.

3. Cut out the pieces with your Cricut Maker.

It’s really easy to sew and fast to assemble by cutting the pieces with your Cricut! This post is sponsored by Cricut. Any opinions given are completely my own.

Bell Sleeve detail|Chambraybluesblog|www.chambrayblues.com

 

Assembly Instructions:

1. Fold sleeve bands in half, right sides out. Stitch together with 5/8″ seam allowance on the long edge.

2. Cut your sleeve piece in half just above the elbow. Sew the contrasting rectangle piece underneath the raw edge of the sleeve with a narrow zig zag stitch 1.5 wide, overlapping the pieces by 1/2 inch.

THE RAW EDGE OF THE KNIT T-SHIRT IS SUPPOSED TO SHOW as in the photo above.

3. Gather the bottom part of the sleeve by stitching along the top edge with 5.0 basting stitch (I added 3″ in the sleeve width to my existing pattern to make the gathered ruffle). Pull up threads and gather the piece to fit the sleeve band (check the fit on your arm before you finish sewing). Overlap the gathered knit sleeve on top of the contrasting fabric by about 1/2″ (right sides up). Stitch in place with narrow zig zag stitch 1.5 wide. THE GATHERED RAW EDGE IS SUPPOSED TO SHOW as in photo.

4. Add lace trim to the bottom of the sleeve hem by stitching lace on with 1/4″ seam allowance using a narrow zig zag stitch.

5. Place the neck facing right side up on the front of the t-shirt neckline with the two pieces touching at center front. Pin in place. Stitch along the outside edge with a narrow zig zag stitch. Tack the facing with the zig zag stitch at center front 1″ from bottom to secure as in photo below.

 

6. Slash center front along the facing at center front to the bottom edge of the facing. Sew lace edging over raw edge with zig zag stitch, folding lace to miter at corners. Sew shoulder seams together. Add lace all around the neck edge, front and back with the same method, folding under ends at center front and tacking in place.

7. Add lace trim to outside of neck facing, stitching again over your first stitching with the same narrow zig zag stitch.

8. Finish shirt by stitching sleeves into armholes, and sewing underarm seam. Hem, press and enjoy! Share with your friends!

 

If you do not want to make an entire t-shirt, you can create this look with two old t-shirts:

1. Cut out contrasting pieces with your Cricut Maker as above.

2. Remove neck ribbing on old t-shirt.

3. Cut 7″ wide strip of fabric off the bottom of one of the t-shirts.

4. Gather fabric along top edge, as in step 3 above. Attach contrasting sleeve trim to existing sleeve edge and lace as described above.

5. Add contrasting fabric at neck as described in step 5 above.

 

Thanks to Cricut for sponsoring this post! If you want more pattern ideas, try these other posts:

How to Restyle a Boring Denim Jacket

How to Read a Sewing Pattern Envelope

How to Shorten Pattern Sleeves

How to Measure for Pattern Alterations

What You Should Know About the Cricut Maker

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

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How to Shorten Pattern Sleeves

How to Shorten Pattern Sleeves

Shortening your pattern sleeves isn’t that complicated but it does take a little bit of know how. Here’s my best tips on shortening, it’s easier than you think!

How to Shorten Sleeves the Right Way|ChambrayBluesblog|www.chambrayblues.com
McCalls Cuting layout M7061

We have all been there. You work so hard on a sewing project, only to discover too late that the sleeves are too long. Chopping off the end of the sleeve and re-hemming does not work in most circumstances because sleeves are not perfect rectangles. It’s easy to shorten them at the beginning of the sewing process. Even before you cut! Here’s how!

Shorten Pattern Sleeves the Right Way

  1. The first step is to be certain how much the sleeves need to be shortened. The best way to do this is to use the measurement from the center back neck, to the wrist. This is not included on pattern envelopes, it used to be on there but for some reason they don’t have it on there any more. Take your own measurement, or have someone else do it for you.
  2. Next, line up your back pattern and the sleeve pattern pieces. Overlap the seam allowances (so they are not included in the measurement), then measure the pattern from center back, across the shoulder to the sleeve hem. Do not include the hem as you measure.
  3. Compare the two measurements to find the amount needed. For example, if my pattern measurement is 30″ and my center back neck to wrist measurement is 28″ I need to shorten the sleeve length by 2″. ( 30″-28″=2″)
  4. Add wearing ease. Generally speaking you want to have ease of at least 1″. You can add more if you wish, but no less. As your arm bends you need extra fabric to compensate for the movement, so it’s important to have enough wearing ease or your garment will be uncomfortable and too short in the sleeves.

Sound complicated? It’s really not. Here’s a video tutorial:

You can follow my You Tube Chanel for regular updates and more tutorials. Also, be sure to subscribe for the Sew Along and join our Facebook group here. I am doing weekly Facebook live sewing sessions, answering questions and hoping to inspire you to keep sewing!

Don’t forget to Pin this post!

Read more about the Sew Along here.

Read more about Measuring for Pattern Alterations here.

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How to Measure for Pattern Alterations

How to Measure for Pattern Alterations

Knowing how to measure for pattern alterations is very important for successful sewing. Here are some tips to get you on the right track!

Sew Along|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com

Measure Before You Cut

It may seem obvious, but measuring plays a big part in sewing. The trick is to measure as accurately as possible before you start altering the pattern. The back of the pattern envelope has basic body measurements for each size. Compare your measurements to the envelope to determine what size pattern to cut.

The measurements are on the envelope flap. Find your estimated size at the top (start with your ready to wear size), then read down the column to find each measurement. You may find that your body size is not the ready to wear size you normally buy in the store. Purchase the pattern size that is closest to your body measurements. Most patterns have several sizes in them which gives you options when you are ready to alter.

Just to clarify, these dimensions are not pattern measurements, they are body measurements. We will cover the pattern measurements in a separate post.

Here’s a live video to walk you through the process.

Like my page Chambray Blues Sewing Tips and Tutorials for updates! 

Important Tips:

  1. Keep the measuring tape parallel to the ground as you measure.
  2. Don’t stretch the tape too tight, vinyl tape measures will stretch and give you a measurement that is inaccurate. Keep the tape taught, but don’t over extend it.
  3. Include a sleeve length measurement. This is not listed on the pattern envelope. Measure from center back neck, across the shoulder, down the arm to the wrist bone. We will use this measurement for accurate sleeve alterations.
  4. Always measure across the fullest part of the body.
  5. Make note of your body measurements for bust, waist, hip, and center back waist length. Then compare them to the size information on the pattern envelope. If your measurements are different, you will have to do some pattern alterations. More info to come!

This week’s goal is to buy the Mc Call’s pattern, take your measurements and choose your fabric. I will have tips on choosing fabric for this project soon!

Don’t forget to pin this post!

How to Take Body Measurements for Sewing|Chambray Blues Blog|chambrayblues.com

For information on the complete Sew Along, read this post!

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