Month: October 2018

Sew Your Own DIY Christmas Decor with Cricut

Sew Your Own DIY Christmas Decor with Cricut

Decorating for Christmas can be so much easier when you use your Cricut Maker! This Christmas stocking and holiday pillow are just the things to make your home have holiday spirit!

Cricut DIY Christmas|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
This pillow is easy to sew, and decorate with your Cricut Maker.

This post is sponsored by Cricut, any opinions given are completely my own. For a complete list of rules, see the disclosures page.

You will love this easy project, simply cut the vinyl and press onto the pillow!

The holidays aren’t far away and I have been inspired to use my Cricut Maker for a couple of fun projects! The first one is an easy to sew pillow that I made from a piece of heavy canvas from my fabric stash. The pillow uses a simple straight stitch and the applique is made from Cricut Heat Transfer Vinyl. I used a standard 18″ square pillow form from the craft store, sewed the cover and decorated it with the Cricut vinyl. It’s a fun project, it would also make a great holiday gift idea! Here’s what you will need to make your own pillow (affiliate links are included for your convenience):

Supplies for Snowflake Pillow

1. 18″ square pillow form

2. Cricut Gold Heat Transfer Vinyl

3. 1/2 yard of off white cotton canvas

4. Sewing machine, thread, scissors

5. Cricut Easy Press 2 or iron

6. Cricut Maker with cutting blade

Cricut DIY Christmas|chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
Weed out the negative space in the design.

Directions

1. Cut the fabric down to a square 23″ wide. Turn fabric right sides together, stitch around the outside edge with a 1/2″ seam allowance leaving an opening at the bottom edge 8″ wide to insert the pillow.

2. Press, turn right side out. Press again from right side.

3. To make the flange, top stitch 1″ from edge all the way around the pillow leaving the bottom open as before. Press.

4. Cut the vinyl on the Cricut Maker according the directions on the Cricut website here. Be sure to use the knife blade on the vinyl setting. Also, be certain to place the vinyl shiny side down on the standard grip mat before cutting.

I used my large Easy Press 2 for this project.

5. Weed out the excess vinyl from the snowflake design. Place the vinyl on the canvas pillow cover with the sticky backing down on the fabric.

6. Pre-heat your Easy Press 2 to 290 degrees, or iron to the high or cotton setting. I loved the using the new large Easy Press 2, worked great for this project! Using a press cloth or Cricut Silicone mat, press for 30 seconds. Turn the pillow over, and press again on the back side for another 30 seconds.

7. Let cool slightly, remove the clear vinyl backing.

Sew the pillow, insert the form. Then close up the seam from the outside.

8. Insert pillow form, stitch bottom opening closed.

Cricut DIY Christmas|Chambraybluesblog|Chambrayblues.com
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Keep your floss on a ring for easy stitching!

The second project I made is this pretty felt stocking. This is a really fun project to work on your hand sewing and embroidery skills. I haven’t embroidered in a long time, and I really enjoyed working on this project. It’s perfect for keeping your hands busy while watching TV in the evenings. Don’t be intimidated by it, there are only 3 stitches in this entire project. They are the satin stitch, the french knot, and the outline stitch. The Cricut draws the initial embroidery design on the felt, and cuts the stocking out at the same time. As you hand embroider you can use a hoop if you desire. To me, it seemed awkward so I didn’t use one. The felt is quite solid and easy to work with without a hoop. I found this embroidery floss ring organizer at the craft store. It made it easy to find the right color floss and unwind it as needed. Only use 2-3 strands of floss at a time as you work. Excess strands of floss can be re-wound on to the plastic tab until needed. I am working on a video demonstrating the stitches and it will be on my You Tube channel soon.

 

Here’s what you will need for this project:

Supplies for Embroidered Felt Stocking

1. 1 yard White glittered felt

2. Cricut Maker, Cricut Fabric Mat and Rotary Cutting Blade

3. Embroidery floss in these colors: dark green, light green, red, dark blue, light blue, yellow, orange and pink.

4. Cricut fabric marking pen.

5. Embroidery Hoops, optional.

6. Hand sewing needles for embroidery ( I used a large eye needle)

Cricut DIY Christmas|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
Embroidery takes a little patience but is well worth the effort!

Directions:

1. Cut the felt to 12 x 24″ as described on the Cricut website here.

2. Insert the fabric pen into the Cricut Maker along with the Rotary fabric cutting blade.

3. Draw and cut the fabric with the Cricut.

4. Remove the stocking from the mat. Embroider according to the Cricut website directions, you can print the pdf document here with the directions.

5. After embroidering, sew a 1/4″ hem on the top edge of each stocking piece.

6. Stitch stocking together by sewing along the outside edges along the marked line.

7. Sew the piece for the stocking hanging loop by folding a rectangle of felt into thirds and stitching along the entire length with a zig-zag stitch.

8. Attach the loop into the corner of the stocking with a single needle top stitch.

9. Spritz the stocking with water to remove the fabric pen marks. Cover with a press cloth, press to remove the marks. You may have to repeat the process a few times until they have all disappeared.

Cricut DIY Christmas|ChambrayBluesblog|Chambrayblues.com
Remove your fabric pen marks by spritzing the mark with water, cover with a press cloth and press.
Don’t forget to Pin this post!
Love how this stocking turned out!

I spent about 15 hours doing the embroidery for this stocking. I found it very relaxing to sew in the evenings when I was too tired to accomplish anything else. It’s great to have a hand sewing project to work on a little each day, you will be amazed at how fast it comes together! If you are a more experienced embroiderer you could probably do it in less time. I haven’t embroidered in many years, and it took me a while to get back into the swing of things. Now that I have done it, I am looking forward to my next hand sewn embroidery project. I love how colorful it is in our kitchen!

Thanks to Cricut for sponsoring this post!

If you love this project you can find other Cricut ideas here:

Make a Chill’n Cricut T-Shirt Collection with #YogaLife

Renaissance Costumes for Halloween with Cricut

Riley Blake Throw Quilt with Cricut-Part 1

Riley Blake Throw Quilt with Cricut Maker -Part 2

Riley Blake Throw Quilt with Cricut – Part 3

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

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Update Your Old Jeans to Fit

Update Your Old Jeans to Fit

What do you do with your old jeans that no longer fit? You can update them so they fit like new with a few scraps of recycled denim, here’s how!

Make Your Jeans Fit|Chambray Blues Blog|Chambrayblues.com
Make your jeans fit better with this easy jean hack!

 

Jeans that Don’t Fit

We are all guilty of purchasing something that didn’t really fit us. Recently, I came home with a pair of jeans that were 3 sizes to small from the department store. I don’t know what possessed me to buy them because I knew they didn’t fit. I wanted a high waist style in a dark denim, but the store did not have my size. I had a coupon and a gift certificate that I needed to use, so I bought them anyway. These brand new jeans were not returnable and had been sitting in my closet for ages. They had never been worn, until now. I could give them to the thrift store, but I was determined to not waste them. After a bit of experimenting, I figured out how to get the perfect fit by sewing an insert down the side of the jeans. The insert is made of strips of recycled denim (I love my scraps of my boys old jeans!) that were stitched together in a colorful stripe. This is an easy project, here’s what you will need:

Make Jeans Fit|Chambray Blues Blog|Chambrayblues.com

Updated Jeans Supplies

• Jeans that are too small

•9-10 Strips of used denim or other heavy fabrics, cut 2 1/2″ wide

•Sewing Machine and thread

•Scissors or rotary cutter, mat and ruler

•Measuring tape

Directions:

1. Measure your waist and record the measurement on a piece of paper. My waist is 42″.

2. Measure the jean waistband circumference. Subtract this number from your waist measurement to get the amount of inches you need to add to the jeans. If you are a curvy fit, you may need to compare the hip measurements as well. My jeans measured 36″ at the waist. So when I subtract 42-36= 8″, 8″ need to be added to get the jeans to fit. By dividing 8 in half, there is 4″ to add to each side of the jeans. If you need to add extra room in the hips, it is easy to shape your insert on a curve so you are adding more to the area where it is needed to fit.

My denim scraps are cut off of our boys old jeans.

Strips are cut 2 1/2″ wide and made as long as possible.

3. Sew the strips of denim together with 1/4″ seam allowance, matching the left edges, the length of the piece. You can piece the strips together if they are too short as needed.

4. Cut into pieces the width that you need for your insert with a rotary cutter or scissors, mine were 4″. If you need more room in the hip, your pieces may be wider in that area. I did not include seam allowance in these calculations for simplicity.

5. Sew the cut strips together edge to edge in long strips until the piece is long enough to fit down the side of your jeans plus 1″ for hemming. Trim away excess. Hem the top and bottom edges of the strip with 1/2″ folded hem.

6. Cut side seam of jeans apart, from hem up through the waistband, removing seam allowance and any rivets that may be in the way of stitching a new seam. Baste pocket to the side of the jeans if needed (My pocket was sewn into the side seam, so when I cut the side seam away the pocket was loose. It was basted in place at the side seam to make the sewing easier for the next step.)

7. With right sides together, sew the insert to the side of the jeans on the front and back. Repeat on the other leg. Press and enjoy!

Make Your Jeans Fit|Chambray Blues Blog|Chambrayblues.com
Make your jeans fit better with this easy jean hack! Don’t forget to Pin this post!

These jeans are now super comfortable to wear! The denim insert has a bit of stretch to it fits great, and it is so nice to have new jeans with a unique design to wear! I am thrilled that this purchase was not a waste of money and I know I will get lots of wear out of them this fall! If you would like more information on diy fashion projects from my Chambray Blues Blog, click here! Thanks to Deborah for having me guest post!

If you love this idea, here are some other recycled fashion posts:

How to Make a Quilted Potholder from Scraps

Mens Thrifted Shirt Upcycle Hack in 7 Steps

Re-cyled Jean Denim Vest

Easy to Make Scrappy Denim Skirt

Make an Upcycled Denim Hat from Old Jeans

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Make a Chill’n Cricut T-Shirt Collection with #YogaLife

Make a Chill’n Cricut T-Shirt Collection with #YogaLife

T-shirts are part of our everyday wardrobe, here’s how you can make your own #yogalife shirts with your Cricut Maker!

Yogalife T-shirt collection|chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
This fun t-shirt collection has something for the entire family!

 

T-shirts are something we wear every day.

I often wear t-shirts to bed, to the grocery store, and certainly to yoga class. Sometimes I sew my own, but I have found that by using the Cricut Maker I can be creative and not get overwhelmed by yet another sewing project. Making t-shirts has become a phenomenon as you can see if look at the Cricut website. Some folks even make t-shirts as part of their small home businesses. Cricut has been asking me to share my T-shirt collection designs with you, all you have to do is login to Design Space on the Cricut website, and click Make it! This post is sponsored by Cricut. Any opinions given are completely my own, for a complete list of rules see the disclosure page.

 

 

Yoga Life T-shirts|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
Camisole style t-shirts can be found at your local Walmart.

Sources for Supplies

My blank T-shirts come from the shelves at Walmart. I am sure you can find them in a store near you. I look for different styles and colors but keep in mind most t-shirts shrink at least 10-20 percent in the laundry. It is best if you can wash and pre-shrink your shirt before putting the graphics on it. The Cricut HTV (Heat Transfer Vinyl) Iron-On vinyl is a very impressive product. It adhere’s easily and washes well to cotton and blended fiber shirts. However, for durability, drying them on high heat is not recommended. Tumble dry on low or hang dry for the best results with the colored vinyl. The metallic vinyls are more delicate and should not go in the dryer at all. I do not recommend using generic vinyls in any form, they will not hold up as well and you will wish you had used the Cricut brand.

Here’s my process for designing and creating these shirts:

#YogaLife T-Shirt Supplies Needed (affiliate links included for your convience):

White or Black adult sized t-shirts, (mine were size LT)

Activewear camisoles, gold and burgundy (I used size XL)

White Toddler Size T-Shirt (I used a 4T)

White Baby Onesie (mine was a 3T month size)

Cricut Black and White Iron on HTV-Vinyl

Cricut Rose Gold Metallic Iron on HTV-Vinyl

Standard Grip Cutting Mat (green)

Cricut Maker or other Cricut Machine

Cricut Easy Press and pressing mat

 

Yogalife t-shirts made with Cricut|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
This shirt uses Cricut Brand Rose Gold Metallic HTV vinyl

#Yoga Life Adult Shirt Directions:

  1. Chose which shirt you want to make and download the design file from the Cricut website below:

• #YogaLife design file

• Yoga Posse design file

•Yoga is my happy place design file

•White Medallion Circle of Life design file

•Rose Gold Circle of Life Medallion design file

 

  1. Choose your iron on vinyl color. Cut the vinyl to fit on the  12″ x 12″ mat. Place vinyl with shiny side down on the mat. Roll with a brayer to smooth out and remove any air bubbles.
  2. Insert the mat in the Cricut, follow the prompts for cutting the vinyl. Be sure the “mirror image” button is selected for designs with text. Remove the vinyl from the mat after cutting.
  3. Weed out the negative space in the design with the weeding tools. I find it’s easiest to do this under a window with good light. You can tape the vinyl to a bright window for weeding out the medallion designs that are more complicated.

Tip: Weed from the outside of the design towards the interior of the design in a circular motion. This keeps you from getting confused, making a mistake and removing parts of the vinyl that are needed for the design. When the design is more intricate, this is even more important. Those medallions take a bit of patience to weed out! I enjoyed working on them while watching tv.

4. Cut away any excess plastic from around the design. Gently, place your design on your shirt to determine placement. Use 2-3 finger widths as a guide under the neckline determine where to put the graphic. Be sure your design is centered left to right, use the armpit area of the shirt for a visual to center the design.

5. Heat up your Easy Press to 320 degrees, or heat your iron on the hottest setting. Cover the design with a pressing mat or press cloth, press for 20 seconds. Turn the shirt over, cover with the pressing mat and press an additional 20 seconds.

6. Remove the mat, let the shirt cool slightly. Then gently pull off the plastic vinyl backing being sure all vinyl is adhered to the shirt. Your shirt is now ready to wear!

 

Here’s how I design my t-shirts in the Cricut Design Space. It’s very easy to use and so much fun that I had to make a video to show you!

Children’s Shirt Directions:

1.Download your chosen file from Design Space from the link below;

•Child Pose shirt design file

•Warrior pose shirt design file

2.Depending on what size you are making you may have to adjust the size of the graphic a bit larger or smaller for your shirt. Then, follow the directions for the adult shirts listed above. I use the same 2-3 finger placement technique under the neckline to place the graphics.

I would love to see photos of your shirts on social media! Show them to me using the #chambraybluesshirts for a chance to be featured on Instagram or join our Chambray Blues Facebook group here for more tips and inspiration!

If you are a blogger and would like to join the Cricut Affiliate program, click here.

Make Yoga Life T-shirts with Cricut|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
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Thanks to Cricut for sponsoring! Here are some more great ideas to make with your Cricut:

Flock of Flamingo T-Shirts with Cricut

You Make Patriotic Holiday Family T-Shirts

3 Step Easy T-Shirt Pattern Hack

15 FAQ You Always Wanted to Know About the Cricut Maker

Riley Blake Throw Quilt with Cricut-Part 1

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

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Renaissance Costume Pattern Review and Construction Tips

Renaissance Costume Pattern Review and Construction Tips

Renaissance costumes are fun to make, I made these costumes recently with my Cricut Maker. Choose fabrics such as cotton, linen or wool for a great result.

Sewing Renaissance Costumes|Chambray Blues|www.chambrayblues.com

 

Men’s Renaissance Costume

Our son Ted was thrilled with the costume I made for him. Overall, it only took a couple days to put this entire look together. This is an historic costume by Simplicity Pattern #S4059. I really enjoyed making this men’s pattern. It is simple to follow and fits really well. I didn’t need to make any size adjustments which is so encouraging! The white shirt was an easy sew using an old queen size sheet for fabric. The Renaissance time period calls for simple fabrics and colors, such as cotton, wool or linen. All of these are great choices and easy to find in stores. This outfit is cotton and linen. The sheet worked well for the white undershirt as the pattern is just HUGE. I used an entire queen size sheet to cut it from. Those big billowy sleeves require A LOT of fabric, but I love how it looks and I wouldn’t change it for the world. I did use interfacing in the collar and elastic in the cuffs, but you could easily do without them as they didn’t have that sort of thing back in the 13th century. As a costume, no one really expects things to be that accurate and I am all for modern inventions that still look fitting for the time period.

The jerkin or vest features wide shoulders and a peplum hem. These were easy to make and attach with a few simple seams. The green cotton broad cloth vest is lined, I used a scrap of mystery lining fabric from the thrift store for this purpose. It works great in this style.

I didn’t need to make the trousers that were included with the pattern, we were fortunate enough to find a pair of black linen draw string pants at the thrift store in Ted’s size. We cut them off just under the knee and left the raw hem to add to the overall effect of the costume.

Renaissance Costumes for Halloween with Cricut|Chambray Blues|www.chambrayblues.com

The leather details are my own design and were cut on the Cricut Maker. Read the complete leather post here. The leather pieces were attached to the jerkin with rivets and grommets. The leather placket gives authenticity and stability to the laced up front, and the grommets were easy to install through all layers with a hammer and a wooden cutting board surface to pound on.

Renaissance Costumes for Halloween with Cricut|Chambray Blues|www.chambrayblues.com
Grommets need to be pounded in place with a hammer.

I won’t kid you, it took a bit of muscle to pound them all in place. But, sometimes it’s very gratifying to hammer away at something that has such a cool manly look. The vest is not washable, but could be sponged clean or dry cleaned with the leather trim. I am not concerned with longevity, I think it will hold up just fine. The front lacing is a faux suede cord I purchased at the craft store.

 

Renaissance Costumes for Halloween with Cricut|Chambray Blues|www.chambrayblues.com

 

Women’s Renaissance Costume

This costume was much more time consuming to make. This pattern is Simplicity pattern #3809. I have made this costume before, several years ago so I was already familiar with it’s construction. Overall this is not hard to construct, but the bodice is time consuming. This time I used different fabrics that required more special care. The corset and over skirt are cut from wool crepe that I found at the thrift store. Wool cannot be ironed directly, you must use a press cloth when pressing all seams. Without a press cloth, the material will have an un-natural permanent shine left from the heat of the iron on the surface. In addition, the seam allowance can leave marks on the right side if it is over pressed. Ideally you should use a pressing ham for pressing the seams to avoid this problem. I used a rolled up towel instead, I haven’t invested in a ham to date but hope to get one soon.

Women’s Fitting Adjustments

As usual, I had to make a large number of fitting changes for the bodice and skirt pattern. The corset was lengthened for my long torso and widened to fit through the waist. The skirt was widened and lengthened as well. I am not very happy with the over all fit of either piece, there are too many puckers for my liking, especially on the corset. Most of the problem is due to the interlining and fabric that I used to line the bodice.

Sewing renassiance costumes|Chambraybluesblog|Chambrayblues.com
1/2″ wide plastic boning is stitched to the lining fabric.

The Simplicity pattern calls for the bodice fabric, interlining, and lining. It has three layers. When I made this style in the past, I used a tapestry for the corset, with muslin interlining and muslin lining. That garment fits me well and is very comfortable to wear. This time, I tried a stiffer interlining thinking it would work better for a more structured garment. I used drapery bastiste as the interlining, which is a thin cotton but very stiff and rigid. It was recommended for making corsets on another blog, and I don’t care for it at all. The purple wool crepe is wonderfully form fitting and shapes easily, but paired with the stiff interlining, it doesn’t shape at all the way it should. The combination of the two incompatible fabrics creates all sorts of puckering that wasn’t there before when I sewed this pattern from different materials.

Also, the lining is too thin and doesn’t offer any additional support. It would work better to have the boning attached to a thicker fabric (you can see it warping in the wrong direction above) such as muslin which is what I used in my first attempt at this garment. The thin lining, stiff boning and even stiffer interlining just don’t seem to work together the way they should, but rather cause rippling and puckering when they pull against each other. The casings for the boning were made from pieces of bias tape stitched on either side, then the 1/2″ wide plastic boning was inserted. Boning supplies can be ordered online from Vogue Fabrics Store.

Renaissance Costumes for Halloween with Cricut|Chambray Blues|www.chambrayblues.com

I would not use a drapery product again for this style, I can actually feel it against my skin through the lining. It’s very scratchy and uncomfortable. I am not sure if I want to rip it all apart and remove it, but I might do that eventually. The bodice has several rows of plastic boning stitched into the lining, which is just a scrap of grey satin from the thrift store. Ideally, I would like a lot more boning for support as I don’t think this design provides enough for my large figure. The gold leaf embroidery detail was added around the neck and center front using a varrigated embroidery thread, before the grommets and leather details were installed.

I have been studying corset fitting and drafting for some time, and I think it would be best for me to draft my own pattern next time around. I have too many fit issues to contend with and I think I would be happier with the result of a custom pattern. Also, I am going to invest in some french Coutil for my next corset, it is expensive fabric (about $25.00 a yard) but authentic for corset making and is perfect for shaping a good fitting garment.

 

Renaissance Costumes for Halloween with Cricut|Chambray Blues|www.chambrayblues.com

The chemise was one I originally made from the same Simplicity pattern a few years ago. Made from ivory cotton voile, is is thin and comfortable. It has three rows of elastic in the sleeves to create the full sleeve look. I love it and occasionally wear it out under a vest for special occasions.

Renaissance Costumes for Halloween with Cricut|Chambray Blues|www.chambrayblues.com

 

The front of the corset has grommets and leather trim that was a design I cut on my Cricut Maker. You can read more about that tutorial here. The grommets were easy to apply to the wool, and the lacing is faux suede cord from the craft store. I was not prepared for how much the corset would change my figure. After lacing it up, my skirts were huge. A corset can easily change your waist measurement by several inches, I forgot this when I measured my waist for the skirt. I need to make skirt smaller so it will fit my shape after corseting. This is a good problem to have! The green underskirt was a silk skirt that I found at the thrift store for a few dollars. I should have added pockets to the over skirt, it didn’t occur to me at the time but next time around I will add them as well.

 

The only bad thing about the underskirt being silk is that it is very slippery against the purple wool fabric over skirt. I will need to tack the over skirt up in place so it doesn’t slip down over the bottom layer when wearing it to the Fair.

That’s it! Hope you enjoyed this tutorial, I have so many fabulous things on my cutting table stop by again soon and see what’s happening!

Don’t forget to Pin this post!

 

For more sewing ideas, try these posts:

Sewing for the Renassiance Faire

Renaissance Costumes for Halloween with Cricut

How to Triumph Over Your Unfinished Sewing Projects

How to Read a Sewing Pattern Envelope

Gertie Inspired Vintage Party Dress

 

 

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15 FAQ You Always Wanted to Know About the Cricut Maker

15 FAQ You Always Wanted to Know About the Cricut Maker

Do you have unanswered questions about purchasing a Cricut Maker? Here’s the run down on all those unanswered details along with an easy beginner project!

What you need to know about the Cricut Maker|ChambrayBluesBlog|chambrayblues.com
The Cricut Maker has a storage compartment for all your supplies.

This post is sponsored by Cricut. I was compensated in some way for writing this post. Any opinions given are completely my own. For a complete list of disclosure rules, see the disclosures page.

Cricut Maker FAQ’s

1. Will I use the machine enough to justify the expense? Absolutely! I have used weekly since I got it. I had no idea how much easier using the Cricut Maker would be for my sewing and craft projects. You will be amazed!

2. What materials can I cut? So many options! In the last few months I have cut cotton quilting fabric, denim, leather, vinyl, exterior vinyl, window clings, craft paper and felt. But the Maker can do so much more! I have plans to use it to cut chip board, card board, craft paper, plastic for stencils, faux suede and more!

3. Will it be easy for me to learn the software? Yes, it’s easy to use. Cricut has a really good help section on their website and whenever I get stuck it’s easy to find the answers that I need.

4. What kind of DIY projects can I make? To date I have made t-shirts, window clings, wooden sign decals, leather appliques, denim hat and purse, bow tie, even a quilt. There are hundreds of ready to make projects waiting for you on the Cricut website. All you have to do is press “Make It” and the machine does the rest.

5. What types of fabric can I cut? Cotton quilting fabric, muslin, satin, crepe, wool, fleece, denim, knit jersey, felt. I am sure there are more but these are the ones I have tried so far.

6. Can I use my old cartridges? Cricut Explore and Maker machines were designed to work with Design Space, rather than as stand-alone machines and cartridges. Simply link your cartridges to your account through Cricut Design Space using your Explore machine or the Cricut Cartridge Adapter to use them.

7. Can I upload my own images? Yes, they are easy to upload into Design Space in jpg, svg or png format.

8. Can I keep my images private? Yes, Cricut has an option to keep your files private if you wish.

What you need to know about the Cricut Maker|Chambray Blues Blog|Chambrayblues.com
Cricut Maker, design your projects on your Ipad!

9. What makes the Cricut Maker different from other machines? The Maker is the “Cadillac” of the Cricut machines. It is designed to work with multiple materials at high speed and has blue tooth capabilities. If you are only using your Cricut to cut one type of material or for a specific type of crafting, you may consider a different model. For example, the Cricut Explore works well for basic paper crafting.

10. What add-ons do I need to use the machine and how expensive will it be? The blades, mats, weeding tools, sewing tools, vinyls and craft papers are all individually priced and sold separately. It is cheaper to get the standard Maker package that includes a selection of these items so you don’t have to purchase them individually. I would also recommend trying the Access membership so you have hundreds of pre-designed projects and templates to choose from for your projects from the very beginning.

11. Do you have to use only Cricut vinyl? No, it is not required. However, other vinyls are lower quality. I have seen people post pictures of projects made from cheap vinyl, they have trouble getting it to adhere, it doesn’t wash well and and many times it doesn’t even come off the plastic backing. If you take the time to make a handmade item, the quality of the vinyl you choose is important. I would not use non-Cricut products for that reason.

12. Do you have to purchase an Easy Press? No, you can use an iron. However, I realized very quickly that a regular iron doesn’t work as well for a number of reasons, especially if you are making multiple heat transfer vinyl projects. A household iron only heats up to 199 degrees F. The Easy Press heats up to 320 degrees F. The hotter temperature helps the vinyl adhere better and faster. In addition, the bottom of the iron is designed for steam, it has holes on it and is not a flat surface. The bottom of the Easy Press is completely flat, no holes. Much better for applying even pressure to the surface of your project when transferring an image. The Easy Press is also square, not pointed like an iron. The square Easy Press design covers a larger surface area for pressing graphics than the iron which is designed for ironing small curves and points. For commercial applications, I recommend starting with an Easy Press, then upgrading to a commercial quality t-shirt heat press at a later time as your business grows.

13. Can I upload my own sewing patterns? Yes! Patterns can be uploaded to design space just like photos and cut on the Cricut Maker. I will show you how to do this in an upcoming tutorial.

14. Can I use my maker with my mobile device? Yes you can use a laptop, ipad or cell phone. I love using my Ipad with my Maker, it’s very simple to use and is user friendly.

15. Is the access membership included? There are hundreds of design files that are free in Cricut Design Space. However, if you want access to THOUSANDS of files you will need to purchase a membership. Cricut Access membership is only $7.99 a month. As much as I love to design, it is far easier and faster to have someone else do the design work for you. You will have plenty of artwork to chose from to make anything your heart desires!

 

Easy jean Patches|ChambrayBlues|chambrayblues.com
Cricut Fabrics from Riley Blake make adorable jean patches!

Things I Wish I Knew

I wish I had known how much a machine like this would change my crafting life! The Cricut is so much fun to use, I have used it for so many things. Besides my obsession with making t-shirts for my family, its great for quilting and sewing projects. The ability to fine cut on this machine is such a time saver. Cutting fabric is so easy and the machine makes such wonderful clean cuts!

Today, I found these adorable jeans at the thrift store. I would have over looked them before with the rips and holes in the front. As much as other people love the tattered look, it’s just not for me. But, I knew I could patch them in a jiffy with my Cricut and I brought them home to work on.

15 Cricut FAQ's|ChambrayBlues|chambrayblues.com
These heart patches were cut with my Cricut Maker.

These patches are made with pre-designed shapes in Design Space. Before I owned a Cricut, I had no idea how there would be thousands of pre-made designs for me to choose from for making projects. It is such a time saver to login to design space and just search for what I need rather than design it from scratch myself. Did I mention that Cricut has their own fabric line with Riley Blake Fabrics? Aren’t these coordinating prints adorable? Who knew? Cricut makes it easy to coordinate, I don’t even have to shop for fabric! Game changer!

Another game changer, is the way the Cricut can cut different materials. Plastic, cardboard, paper, fabric, fleece, so many choices. Today I experimented cutting with heat bond. This product is ironed on to the back of the fabric, then cut into patches that are ironed on to the jeans. It’s a quick and easy way to fix your favorite jeans. Here’s what you will need to make your own patches:

 

Patches Project Supplies Needed (affiliate links are included for your convience)

• A pair of jeans in need of repair

Cricut Designer Fabric Sampler by Riley Blake, Blue Carolina

•Fusible Heat Bond

Cricut Fabric Mat and rotary cutting blade

•Embroidery floss for decorative stitching on edges, optional

15 FAQ's about the Cricut maker|Chambray Blues|Chambrayblues.com
Patch your jeans with these cute hearts!

Directions:

1. Iron the heat bond to the back of the fabric using the cotton setting (or use an Easy Press). Do not remove paper backing.

2. Smooth the backed fabric onto the fabric mat. Use a bayer or roller for the best adhesion to the mat.

3. Download the patches design from Cricut Design Space here.

4. Cut the patches on the Cricut as directed.

5. Peel off the paper backing from heat bond on the back of the patches. Iron the patches on to your jeans with your iron on the cotton setting (or use an Easy Press for quick adhesion).

6. Add decorative stitching with embroidery thread around the patches if desired.

 

Thanks to Cricut for sponsoring this post! If you love this post, don’t forget to Pin it!

15 FAQ's about the Cricut Maker|ChambrayBlues|chambrayblues.com
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More Cricut Projects!

Make an Upcycled Denim Hat from Old Jeans

Riley Blake Throw Quilt with Cricut-Part 1

Riley Blake Throw Quilt with Cricut Maker -Part 2

Riley Blake Throw Quilt with Cricut-Part 3

3 Step Easy T-Shirt Pattern Hack

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut . The opinions and text are all mine.

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