Month: November 2018

Sew a 3 Step Buffalo Check Cardigan

Sew a 3 Step Buffalo Check Cardigan

Sew a Buffalo Check Cardigan in just 3 easy steps! It’s warm and cozy, great for those chilly winter days!

Easy Buffalo Cardigan

We recently went on a road trip to the mountains of North Carolina. It was colder than I expected, and I didn’t bring a coat. My buffalo check cardigan was plenty warm despite the freezing temps and I have been wearing it ever since! It was an easy item to sew with McCalls Pattern #7262. This pattern is great for sweater knits, wool or fleece. I used inexpensive buffalo fleece from JoAnn Fabrics for this project and a few simple pattern matching tricks.

Buffalo Check Cardigan in 3 Easy Steps
Simple details make this item easy to sew! Photo from McCalls website.

 

There are many things I love about this cardigan. The flowing design is comfortable and easy to wear over a t-shirt or turtleneck top. The long length covers any multitude of figure flaws and is very flattering. I decided to simplify this project into 3 easy steps to sew for a very beginner to make!

Hubby and I visited the Biltmore Mansion in North Carolina.

Buffalo Cardigan Supplies Needed:

•3 yards buffalo check fleece fabric

•McCalls Pattern #7262

•Marking pen and ruler for marking patterns

•Straight pins

•Serger or regular sewing machine with a narrow Zig-zag stitch

 

Buffalo Check Pattern Matching and Cutting Directions:

  1. Cut out front, back and sleeve pattern pieces and make any needed length adjustments. The pattern pieces are large because the collar is in one with the body of the sweater so they may look a bit odd!
  2. Lay out your fabric on the cutting table, pinning selvedges together to match the print every few inches. Be sure that the black squares match and the red squares match EXACTLY on both layers.
  3. Lay your front pattern piece on top of the fabric. Line up the underarm area of the front pattern piece with the top of a black or red square. Pin in place, checking to see that the fabric design also matches on the bottom layer of fabric. Mark your position of the print (red square top or black square top) on the pattern piece front and back with a ruler and pen. Pin entire front pattern in place.
  4. Repeat for the back pattern piece, matching the print at the underarm seam as before. If you pinned your front underarm at the top of a red square, pin the back piece on the same position in the print at the same underarm point. Pin entire back pattern in place once you are sure the pattern will line up. Do not worry about matching other points in the print. If the prints match under the arms, they will match everywhere else (shoulders and side seams) automatically.
  5. Lay out sleeve pattern, matching the same point in the print that you used before at the front and back underarm seams. Hint: It helps to visually line up the pattern piece to see how the print will match. Mark with a marking pen on the tissue paper pattern so there is no mistake where the prints will line up before laying out the pattern.
  6. Cut all pieces out after re-checking how the fabric will match a second time.

Easy 3 step buffalo cardigan|Chambray Blues blog|www.chambrayblues.com

3 Step Buffalo Check Cardigan Sewing Directions:

  1. Sewing the center back collar seams together.
  2. Sew the front and back shoulder seams together.
  3. Stitch the side seams.

That’s it! Crazy simple right? So, why are patterns always so complicated? Much of it has to do with the type of fabric that is used for sewing. When using fleece fabric you do not need to finish the seam edges. This fabric saves a lot of steps! You can finish the seams if you wish, however, fleece will never unravel and is very stable even after multiple washings. By eliminating the buttons and buttonholes, there is no need for interfacing or facings. I did not hem my cardigan because it was already the perfect length and will not unravel. This cardigan would also make a great gift to sew for someone.

You can see in the photo that the print matches well at the side seam. By taking the time to match the print when cutting there is no need to fuss when sewing the seams together. It’s a great way to learn how to match prints, without a lot of stress! Fleece is easy to sew because it has some give to it. If you make a mistake and the print isn’t matching the way you want it to, you can pull the fabric a bit as you stitch to fix it. Easy peasy!

Let me know how your project turns out! Tag me on Instagram post in our Facebook Group!

 

More easy tutorials can be found below:

3 Step Easy T-Shirt Pattern Hack

Tees to Undies, Refashion Your Shirts to Underwear

Men’s Thrifted Shirt Upcycle Hack in 7 Steps

Sew Along 2018, the Year of the Blues!

Sew a Pocket Square in 3 Easy Steps

 

Please follow and like us:
Tees to Undies, Refashion Your Shirts to Underwear

Tees to Undies, Refashion Your Shirts to Underwear

T-shirts wear out quickly, but you can reuse them by making them into some new underwear! Here’s how to use your favorite tee’s and make undies!

Tees to Undies|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
Use any tee’s you have around the house, these were left behind by my sons who went off to college.

Tees to Undies

If you house is anything like ours, you have piles of extra t-shirts laying around. Somehow they seem to multiply no matter how hard I try to eliminate them. I used to give everything to the thrift store, but giving things away doesn’t help stretch my household budget. I have been on a quest to find new uses for things we already have in the house. Recently, I saw someone post this idea on social media: making old t-shirts into new undies is a brilliant concept. I love that it reuses what you already have, plus it keeps more t-shirts from finding their way into the landfill. According to statistics, even thrift stores can only sell 20 percent of the donations that they receive. That means, that your thoughtful donation often ends up in the landfill or gets sold off to a foreign country. Either way it doesn’t help your budget, and help your family make ends meet.

These t-shirt boxers are great for men or women, kids or adults. I self drafted a pattern from my favorite pair of boxers with a few easy steps. Here’s how to do it:

Make Your Own Undies Boxer Pattern

1. Turn your favorite undies inside out. Fold them in half at center front and center back. Pin together any seams to keep them from shifting.

2. Lay flat on a piece of folded paper or scrap fabric. Trace around the shape with a pen or a pencil. You may be able to flatten one part of the garment at a time while you trace it. You can use a ruler to help straighten the lines a bit if needed.

3. Add 1/2″ seam allowance around the piece on the outside edges. Mark pieces front and back accordingly. Include one notch somewhere along the back crotch seam so you know which is the front and which is the back.

Tees to Undies|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
Place your pattern pieces over the colored graphics.

4. Lay out your pattern pieces on the t-shirt. I liked the colored graphics so I tried to place the pattern over as much of it as possible.

5. Cut out your pattern pieces. Don’t worry, if it doesn’t turn out you can throw it away. Practice makes perfect. You were going to throw away the tee anyway remember?

Tees to Undies Sew your own boxers|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
Boxers are ready to be stitched!

Tee’s to Undies Sewing Directions:

These garments are very easy to sew. You can use wide 1 5/8″ elastic at the waist purchased from the fabric store, or better yet cut off a piece from an old pair of boxers and re-use it.

1. Sew together the center front crotch seam with a narrow zig-zag stitch 1.5-2.0mm. You can serge the seam instead if you have a serger. For men’s boxers, add an extra piece of fabric 4″ wide (folded in half lengthwise to a width of 2″ the length of the placket) to make the placket opening. Stitch placket to crotch seam to desired opening length, fold placket to back side of opening, then top stitch in place on the front side. Add a front button or snap closure if desired. Confused? Look at a pair of your own boxers for reference.

2. Sew together the center back crotch seam with the same method.

3. Sew together the front and back at the side seams. Stitch remaining crotch seam together.

Tees to Undies|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
Lace is great for finishing hem of boxers.

4. To finish leg opening, either hem as desired or add lace. Stitch 2″ lace hem tape to the bottom of the leg openings by overlapping the lace and fabric by 1/4″. Zig-zag along the edge of the lace to attach. Fold over lace edge and enclose raw edges, then zig zag the opening closed to finish the leg. Repeat on other leg.

Stitch elastic in place with a narrow zig zag stitch.

5. To finish waistline, measure elastic to fit waist comfortably (it needs to be snug and stretched a bit so it’s not too loose). Divide and fold elastic into four equal parts and mark with pins. Beginning at the center back seam, pin elastic in place to waist matching a pin to center back, side seam, center front seam and opposite side seam. Stretch elastic slightly to fit while sewing with zig-zag stitching, attaching elastic on to waist overlapping elastic and fabric by at least 1/4″. Fold under raw edge of elastic at center back seam and secure with zig zag stitches.

Undies to Tees Boxer Briefs|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
Look how colorful these boxers are!

 

Back view: Adorable!

I can’t wait to make more of them! I you are not confident in your ability to make your own boxers pattern, you can get my pattern for free by being on my mailing list here. If you need more sewing patterns to choose from try some of these boxer and undie patterns.

For more fun re-fashioning ideas try these posts:

Mens Thrifted Shirt Upcycle Hack in 7 Steps

Re-cyled Jean Denim Vest

How to Restyle a Boring Denim Jacket

Easy to Make Scrappy Denim Skirt

How to Make a Recycled Denim Ruffled Purse with Cricut and Simplicity

 

 

 

Please follow and like us:
Cricut Easy Press Gadgets Explained for the Non-Crafter

Cricut Easy Press Gadgets Explained for the Non-Crafter

The latest generation of the Cricut Easy Press is on the market, here’s everything you need to know even if you are a Non-Crafter!

Easy Press Gadgets Explained|Chambrayblues|Chambrayblues.com
The Easy Press 2, second generation of heat presses.

Easy Press Gadgets Explained

They are here! The new generation of Cricut heat presses, Cricut Easy Press 2, are now available! I am pleased to be able to share these with you! I love my Easy Press, but I love the Easy Press 2 even more. What’s the difference? Here’s the low down, explained for even the Non-Crafters out there! There’s also a few new projects in this post, stay tuned for the how to! This post is sponsored by Cricut. I was compensated to write this post in someway. Any opinions given are completely my own. For a complete list of disclosure rules, please see the disclosures page.

Cricut Easy Press Gadgets Explained|Chambrayblues|Chambrayblues.com
The Easy Press and Easy Press 2 look similar but they have different features.

 

Cricut Heat Presses, Compared

Other than the color, these two heat presses look pretty similar. The original heat press is blue, the new heat press is red. These are both 9″ x 9″ in size. The main difference in the design here is the temperature settings. The original heat press heats to 320 degrees in just a few minutes. However, the Easy Press 2 heats up 25 percent faster, and can reach temperatures of 400 degrees. The Easy Press 2 rivals the commercial heat presses that can heat between 375-400 degrees. Commercial presses are large, expensive and certainly not very efficient. The Cricut Easy Press 2 can do the job so much easier!That’s impressive! I love this medium Easy Press size for making small to medium size t-shirts, tote bags, tea towels, etc.

 

Cricut Easy Press Gadgets Explained|Chambrayblues|chambrayblues.com
Yoga Life T-Shirt with Easy Press

I used the original Easy Press for my original t-shirt collections, such as my #Yoga Life t-shirt collection. You can read that tutorial here. The original Easy Press heats up very quickly, and I found that I didn’t need to waste energy by turning it on too soon. This is great since my studio space is small and this little press heats up my entire room if it’s on too long. Another feature that I love, it automatically turns off after a period of inactivity. This has been a real life saver for me, since I tend to get side tracked by other things and forget to turn it off at times. Does anyone else do that?? Such a great feature!

Cricut Easy Press Gadgets Explained|Chambrayblues|chambrayblues.com
You can use an iron for heat transfer vinyl, but I don’t recommend it.

My first t-shirt with heat transfer vinyl, or HTV vinyl was made using a regular iron. It was a disaster! I learned very quickly that a household iron does not work the same way! My iron takes forever to heat up, and is so small it only covers a very small part of the Heat Transfer Vinyl (or HTV) t-shirt design. I had to press, and press and repress to get the vinyl to adhere. It was frustrating!

Cricut Easy Press Gadgets Explained|Chambrayblues|Chambrayblues.com
The bottom of the heat press and household iron are very different.

When you compare the bottom of the Easy Press or Easy Press 2 and the bottom of a household iron, you can see the difference. An iron is designed to produce streams of steam with holes and indentations. It is also pointed at the tip for fine pressing. The Easy Press is perfectly square, flat, and has more surface area to come in contact with the vinyl. Therefore the Easy Press produces a better result with less effort. Another interesting fact, a household iron only reaches a maximum of 190 degrees Fahrenheit. The Easy Press 2 heats up to 400 degrees, that’s a HUGE difference in temperature! It’s no wonder that first t-shirt peeled apart in short time, my iron just wasn’t hot enough to make the vinyl stick.

I use the 9″ x 9″ size for small to medium size t-shirts.

My latest Toddler size shirt was made with the Cricut Easy Press 2. Faster and hotter, I whipped this shirt together in record time! You can get the free #Team Dark Meat graphic design from my Cricut page here!

Right Size for the Job

It is not necessary to own more than one Heat Press. However, I will say it makes things so much easier! The new Easy Press 2 devices include an extra large 16″ x 10″ size which is great for XLL t-shirts, tote bags, pillows, and banners. I used the large Easy Press for this XXL T-shirt. I always size my t-shirt graphics accordingly to the larger size shirts, since that is mostly what my family wears. With a smaller Heat Press, I would have to press this design in at least two places, but the extra large heat press does it all in one pressing. I also used this large size for my recent Christmas Snowflake Pillow project here.

Like this Thanksgiving holiday t-shirt? You can download the design file here!

The MIni Easy Press 2 is my favorite!

The Mini Heat Press is Mighty

I saved this one for last, the mini size Easy Press 2 is 6″ x 7″. So adorable! It’s the perfect size for making baby onesies, baby bibs and make up bags. This Easy Press 2 has all the great features of the other Easy Press 2’s, just in a compact size. So handy! This little baby Onesie came together in a jiffy using this mini press! Get the Thanksgiving Dinner Onesie design download here!

Each Easy Press size has a coordinating Easy Press mat.

 

Each size Easy Press has a coordinating size mat. I like organizing the mats by size so I can easily grab the one that I need for my project. The different sizes are so handy, I use them all the time! Cricut also has a handy guide for selecting which temperature setting to use for your type of vinyl, you can find that guide here.

I hope that answers all of your questions regarding the Cricut Easy Press projects. Let’s get crafty! Don’t forget to share your shirts on social media with my hashtag #Chambraybluesshirt for a chance to be featured on my Instagram page! Thanks to Cricut for sponsoring this post!

Easy Press Explained|Chambrayblues|chambrayblues.com
Pin this post!

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

Please follow and like us: