Category: activewear

Make a Chill’n Cricut T-Shirt Collection with #YogaLife

Make a Chill’n Cricut T-Shirt Collection with #YogaLife

T-shirts are part of our everyday wardrobe, here’s how you can make your own #yogalife shirts with your Cricut Maker!

Yogalife T-shirt collection|chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
This fun t-shirt collection has something for the entire family!

 

T-shirts are something we wear every day.

I often wear t-shirts to bed, to the grocery store, and certainly to yoga class. Sometimes I sew my own, but I have found that by using the Cricut Maker I can be creative and not get overwhelmed by yet another sewing project. Making t-shirts has become a phenomenon as you can see if look at the Cricut website. Some folks even make t-shirts as part of their small home businesses. Cricut has been asking me to share my T-shirt collection designs with you, all you have to do is login to Design Space on the Cricut website, and click Make it! This post is sponsored by Cricut. Any opinions given are completely my own, for a complete list of rules see the disclosure page.

 

 

Yoga Life T-shirts|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
Camisole style t-shirts can be found at your local Walmart.

Sources for Supplies

My blank T-shirts come from the shelves at Walmart. I am sure you can find them in a store near you. I look for different styles and colors but keep in mind most t-shirts shrink at least 10-20 percent in the laundry. It is best if you can wash and pre-shrink your shirt before putting the graphics on it. The Cricut HTV (Heat Transfer Vinyl) Iron-On vinyl is a very impressive product. It adhere’s easily and washes well to cotton and blended fiber shirts. However, for durability, drying them on high heat is not recommended. Tumble dry on low or hang dry for the best results with the colored vinyl. The metallic vinyls are more delicate and should not go in the dryer at all. I do not recommend using generic vinyls in any form, they will not hold up as well and you will wish you had used the Cricut brand.

Here’s my process for designing and creating these shirts:

#YogaLife T-Shirt Supplies Needed (affiliate links included for your convience):

White or Black adult sized t-shirts, (mine were size LT)

Activewear camisoles, gold and burgundy (I used size XL)

White Toddler Size T-Shirt (I used a 4T)

White Baby Onesie (mine was a 3T month size)

Cricut Black and White Iron on HTV-Vinyl

Cricut Rose Gold Metallic Iron on HTV-Vinyl

Standard Grip Cutting Mat (green)

Cricut Maker or other Cricut Machine

Cricut Easy Press and pressing mat

 

Yogalife t-shirts made with Cricut|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
This shirt uses Cricut Brand Rose Gold Metallic HTV vinyl

#Yoga Life Adult Shirt Directions:

  1. Chose which shirt you want to make and download the design file from the Cricut website below:

• #YogaLife design file

• Yoga Posse design file

•Yoga is my happy place design file

•White Medallion Circle of Life design file

•Rose Gold Circle of Life Medallion design file

 

  1. Choose your iron on vinyl color. Cut the vinyl to fit on the  12″ x 12″ mat. Place vinyl with shiny side down on the mat. Roll with a brayer to smooth out and remove any air bubbles.
  2. Insert the mat in the Cricut, follow the prompts for cutting the vinyl. Be sure the “mirror image” button is selected for designs with text. Remove the vinyl from the mat after cutting.
  3. Weed out the negative space in the design with the weeding tools. I find it’s easiest to do this under a window with good light. You can tape the vinyl to a bright window for weeding out the medallion designs that are more complicated.

Tip: Weed from the outside of the design towards the interior of the design in a circular motion. This keeps you from getting confused, making a mistake and removing parts of the vinyl that are needed for the design. When the design is more intricate, this is even more important. Those medallions take a bit of patience to weed out! I enjoyed working on them while watching tv.

4. Cut away any excess plastic from around the design. Gently, place your design on your shirt to determine placement. Use 2-3 finger widths as a guide under the neckline determine where to put the graphic. Be sure your design is centered left to right, use the armpit area of the shirt for a visual to center the design.

5. Heat up your Easy Press to 320 degrees, or heat your iron on the hottest setting. Cover the design with a pressing mat or press cloth, press for 20 seconds. Turn the shirt over, cover with the pressing mat and press an additional 20 seconds.

6. Remove the mat, let the shirt cool slightly. Then gently pull off the plastic vinyl backing being sure all vinyl is adhered to the shirt. Your shirt is now ready to wear!

 

Here’s how I design my t-shirts in the Cricut Design Space. It’s very easy to use and so much fun that I had to make a video to show you!

Children’s Shirt Directions:

1.Download your chosen file from Design Space from the link below;

•Child Pose shirt design file

•Warrior pose shirt design file

2.Depending on what size you are making you may have to adjust the size of the graphic a bit larger or smaller for your shirt. Then, follow the directions for the adult shirts listed above. I use the same 2-3 finger placement technique under the neckline to place the graphics.

I would love to see photos of your shirts on social media! Show them to me using the #chambraybluesshirts for a chance to be featured on Instagram or join our Chambray Blues Facebook group here for more tips and inspiration!

If you are a blogger and would like to join the Cricut Affiliate program, click here.

Make Yoga Life T-shirts with Cricut|Chambraybluesblog|chambrayblues.com
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Thanks to Cricut for sponsoring! Here are some more great ideas to make with your Cricut:

Flock of Flamingo T-Shirts with Cricut

You Make Patriotic Holiday Family T-Shirts

3 Step Easy T-Shirt Pattern Hack

15 FAQ You Always Wanted to Know About the Cricut Maker

Riley Blake Throw Quilt with Cricut-Part 1

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

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Sewing Rainwear, What You Need to Know for Success

Sewing Rainwear, What You Need to Know for Success

In this week’s podcast, we talk about sewing rainwear and what you need to know to get the job done.

Sewing Rainwear, What You Need to Know for Success|Chambray Blues blog|www.chambrayblues.com

The Ins and Outs of Sewing Rainwear

I decided it would be fun to try something completely different from my usual sewing projects. With the rainy season here, I decided on sewing a raincoat.

There are several different types of fabric you can use for rain wear, either waterproof or water resistant. They are not the same thing. Waterproof fabrics do not allow any water penetration, verses water resistant fabrics that just repel some of the water.

To achieve truly waterproof fabric requires two or three layers within the fabric. The material, and an inner layer or layers are bonded together, usually by a high tech process called Ultrasonic welding.

Ultrasonic welding is achieved by multiple panel edges are carefully aligned together, pressed, then fused together with high levels of ultrasonic sound waves.  The energy from these sound waves is transformed into heat, which permanently bonds the two panels together (usually containing a thermoplastic material), making the two or more panels into one solid panel, with no holes whatsoever.  This type of machine is expensive, the technicians that run them are also more expensive than an average garment worker, and the material cost is reflected in this technology. This is where science and technology have changed so much in the sewing world. The result is a completely waterproof fabric that is also breathable due to the inner layers.

I couldn’t wait to try this out! Who ever thought that sewing was boring??? Fabrics that use this type of technology are 2 or 3 ply Ultra-Tex, SWB-Tex, Hyro-Shield Ripstop, and Storm Fit.

For water resistant fabrics, fabrics are woven together very tightly, water molecules are small and can filter through the fibers because it doesn’t have a backing. Light rainfall cannot pass through these tiny pores since rain drops aren’t always that big, but high water pressure from a constant downpour or submersion will cause water to find its way through the fibers.

Fabrics that are water resistant are coated Taslan, Microsuede Polyester, coated Taffeta, ripstop, Silkara, Weather Max-65 and Ten Mile Cloth.

For my project I purchased two different fabrics, the water resistant 2 ply Ultra-Tex and a soft silky water resistant Silkara for a second project.

Supplies and Resources:

Fabric sources for rainwear fabric and supplies such as grippers, waterproofing tape and buttons can be purchased at: Seattle Fabrics, Fabrics.com, LA Finchfabrics.com, Moodfabrics.com.

    1. a gabardine or twill fabric and add waterproofing after the garment is sewn instead. Can’t use fusible interfacing, it doesn’t stick to Gorex or fabrics that have a rubberized backing.
    2. Alterations to fit, lengthen the pattern. Easy to fit a dolman sleeve.
    3. Simple is easier, don’t add the fine details if you are not comfortable with them.
    4. Cutting and sewing a lining. Slippery stuff! So hard to cut! Use pattern weights and very sharp pins and scissors.
    5. Buttons vs. Grippers: Gripper snaps are easier to install but can cause tears in the fabric unless it’s interfaced. Use a good quality denim gripper for best results.Rainwear sewing techniques, waterproof fabrics are a little different animal. Can’t rip out stitches because the needle leaves holes. Can’t pin either for the same reason. Can use

    Waterproof Fabric Tips

    1. Waterproof fabrics require special care when cutting. You can’t use pins because they put holes in the fabric. Also, fabrics such as Gortex has the heavy backing which is very thick and pins won’t poke through it. You will need to use pattern weights, and lots of them when laying out the pattern to cut.
    2. Fusible interfacing doesn’t work with this type of fabric. I tried ironing some on at low heat (so the fabric doesn’t melt), and though it seemed like it was working the glue did not hold in the long run. Use a sew in interfacing instead for this project.
    3. A walking foot is essential for sewing this “sticky” fabric. One side of the fabric is slick, the other sticks like glue to everything. It gets stuck under the presser foot and doesn’t move as you are sewing. If you don’t have a walking foot, you could try using a piece of freezer paper under the presser foot to help it slide under the presser foot.
    4. A sharp needle is a must. I used a size 14 all purpose needle for this project.
    5. Good quality thread makes a huge difference, Gutterman thread was recommended by the fabric supplier and that’s what I used. Fabric was purchased from Seattle Fabrics.com.
    6. Making buttonholes was challenging. The pattern had buttons and snaps as options, I decided on buttons because they were easy to find. I think snaps would have worked better because the button holer kept sticking to the fabric as I mentioned above and was very cumbersome to use. I made several mistakes with my buttonholes, and I just have to live with how they turned out.
    7. You can’t rip out stitches with this type of fabric because it leaves holes. You only get one chance to do it right, and for the same reasons Gortex is just difficult to work with.

    Waver Jacket Pattern Review

    I have not sewn with many pdf patterns, as I usually just stick with one of the name brands. This pdf was overall well designed, but I spotted a couple of things that could have made this project turn out so much better.

    1. The Center front wasn’t cut on the straight grain: This may seem like a small detail, but this one change could have made this coat so much better. Grain line placement makes a huge difference in how the finished coat hangs. As you can see from my photos, the coat appears to have too much fullness at center front, and hides the buttons when hanging. This is because the marked grain line was at an angle to the center front, generally a no-no in the design world. Particularly with center front button plackets, the front grain must be cut on the straight grain for the best result. I knew I should have changed it when I cut it, but for some reason I didn’t. Live and learn from my mistake!
    2. Pocket placement could be better: The pockets are way to close to the center front. I did alter the pattern and added extra fullness at the side seam. The pockets should have been moved at least 2″ closer to the side seam.
    3. Lining hem could be longer: Most quality coats have what is called a jump hem. That is, a hem that has 1/2″ or more extra length in the lining so that when you move your arms and shoulders the extra length keeps the hem hanging straight and doesn’t pull up as you move. This coat was not designed this way and I discovered too late that the hem pulls up in an unattractive manor when moving about. If I make it again, I will add extra 1″ of length to the lining. For now, I stitched the hem of the lining independently from the jacket, allowing the extra movement that is needed.

    Overall this was a challenging project. The fabric I chose was not easy to work with, but I am still pleased with it. My purpose in making this jacket was to have something to wear for walking outside and working in the yard on wet days. The jacket serves it’s purpose even though it isn’t as perfect as I would like. The color alone makes me happy every time I put it on.

    See the full sewing tutorial here.

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